The Hurricane and Storm Waterfront Home Protection Guide
The complete guide to protecting waterfront homes from hurricane and storm damage.
             

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
How To Make Your Home
Flood Safe
By Capt. Dan Berg

The complete homeowners guide to storm protection, flood prevention, rebuilding with water resistant materials and house lifting.

* New Book *
To order:  amazon.com

                     (click link)

In recent years it has become apparent that natural disasters, including hurricanes and resulting floods, have become an increasingly common issue for homeowners. Repairing the destruction caused by these natural events has either put many in debt, or cost them their life savings. Now, with this informative new book, property owners can learn how to prepare in advance and protect their most valuable assets. Flood Safe is a 6x9 full color, soft cover text which provides information designed to help property owners, prepare for, clean up after and prevent future flood damage. Readers will learn how to prevent floodwaters from entering their homes, avert mold growth as well as proper utilization of water-resistant construction materials. The book contains a wealth of the authorís real-life solutions, learned from over 30 years of his own flood-related experiences. During the process of dealing with FEMA, public adjusters, surveyors, architects, building departments, house-lifting companies and contractors, the author learned, often the hard way, how the mitigation process works.

This book passes that information along and provides homeowners with a simple-to-follow guide allowing them to not only prevent water from entering their homes and to make the right decisions regarding rebuilding or mitigation, but to successfully navigate the seemingly endless government paperwork that many homeowners must deal with following any natural disaster. Flood Safe is set up in chronological order, starting with storm preparation and preventing flood damage, moving on to post-flood cleanup and mold prevention. Following sections detail repairs with water-resistant materials as well as extensive information on home elevation.

House lifting is perhaps the ultimate means of flood mitigation, or preventing future flood damage. If you are considering lifting your home, this book details not only the types of lifting techniques for
different home designs, but what homeowners can expect during the process. Readers will also learn how to make the finished lifted home have spectacular curb appeal. This text is packed with hundreds of full-color photographs and illustrations. Included is a complete pictorial record showing the authorís home-elevation project. The author also helps homeowners navigate through the often overwhelming snarl of government red tape while seeking repair resources. The authorís goal is to provide a resource that prevents homeowners from wasting valuable time and effort. He gives the information needed prior to, during and after a flood.
 

 

 

 
Topics Covered

Hurricane and Storm Protection
Emergency Supplies
Home Preparation
Flood-Proofing
     Dry Flood-Proofing
     Water Barricades
     Sandbags
     Garage Door
     Entrance Door
     Sliding Doors
     Residential Waterproof Doors
     Sewage Valves
     Water Pumps
     Generators
Wet Flood-Proofing
Evacuation Plan
Post-flood Clean Up
     Mold Prevention
Rebuild, Replace, Lift or Sell
     Funding repairs or mitigation
     Rebuilding with Water-resistant Materials
Rising Above the Flood
     Base Flood Elevation
     New Construction
     Modular Homes
     House Lifting
          Architectural Rendering
          Picking a Lifting Company
          General Contractor Selection
          Design Professional
          Soil Bore Testing
          Utilities
          Raised Foundation
     Flood Vents
     Type V Flood Zones
     Piers
          Wood Pilings
          Helical Piles
     Elevation Techniques
          Crawlspace Construction 
          Slab-On-Grade Foundations
     Abandoning Lower Level
     Re-location
     Landscaping

 
LEARN HOW TO KEEP YOUR HOME SAFE FROM FLOODS

 

 

 
In recent years it has become apparent that natural disasters, including hurricanes and resulting floods, have become an increasingly common issue for homeowners. Repairing the destruction caused by these natural events has either put many in debt, or cost them their life savings.
 
 
Readers will learn how to prevent floodwaters from entering their homes, avert mold growth as well as proper utilization of water-resistant construction materials
 
 
 
 
Learn the proper placement of Flood Vents so future flood waters flow will not cause foundation damage and to reduce future flood insurance premiums.
 
 
House lifting is perhaps the ultimate means of flood mitigation, or preventing future flood damage. If you are considering lifting your home, this book details not only the types of lifting techniques for different home designs, but what homeowners can expect during the process.
 
 
 
 
How To Make Your Home
Flood Safe
By Capt. Dan Berg

The complete homeowners guide to storm protection, flood prevention, rebuilding with water resistant materials and house lifting.

 
To order: amazon.com

                (click link)

 

 

 

 
 
Sample Pages    
 

How To Make Your Home
Flood Safe
By Capt. Dan Berg

The complete homeowners guide to storm protection, flood prevention, rebuilding with water resistant materials and house lifting.

* New Book *
To order: amazon.com

                      (click link)

 

 

 

 

 
Above: The authors home resting on its new elevated foundation.

Below: The same house after using construction and landscaping techniques from Flood Safe to hide a portion of the raised foundation walls. The result is a home that is safe from future flood waters and still has great curb appeal.
 

 

How To Make Your Home
Flood Safe
By Capt. Dan Berg

The complete homeowners guide to storm protection, flood prevention, rebuilding with water resistant materials and house lifting.

* New Book *
To order:  amazon.com

                       (click link)

 

 

 

 

Hurricane and Storm Protection
Hurricanes, noríeasters and other major storms can totally demolish homes and wreak havoc on the lives of thousands in coastal communities. It may be impossible to completely protect your home and property from the devastating impact of these powerful storms, but homeowners should do as much as possible to be prepared for them to minimize damage. Mitigation is the effort to reduce the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of disasters. Mitigation is taking action now, before the next disaster. For the purpose of this book mitigation will cover storm preparation, keeping the water out, cleaning up after a flood, preventing mold, repairing or rebuilding with water-resistant materials, and the benefits of higher elevation construction or lifting your current home to prevent future damage. Homeowners can take a variety of actions to help survive a storm. They can also do quite a bit to help prevent damage to their homes and property. Remember the most important and most valuable possessions you have are the lives of your family and yourself. Prepare and protect your home, but also realize that when itís time to evacuate you have to leave. Homes can always be rebuilt, lives can never be replaced.

Emergency Supply List
Flashlight and extra batteries
Candles and a lighter
Matches in a waterproof container
First-aid kit
Reference material such as a first-aid book
Wet wipes
Garbage bags and ties
Tool set
Local maps
Cell phone, chargers, inverter or solar charger
Prescription medications
Cash or travelerís checks and change
Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container
Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person
Additional bedding if you live in cold climates
Complete change of clothing including a long-sleeve shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes
Consider additional clothing for a cold climate
Household bleach and a medicine dropper
Fire extinguisher
Feminine supplies and personal-hygiene products
Camping supplies
Mess kits, paper cups, plates, paper towels, plastic utensils
Paper and pencil
Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children
Insect repellent,
Soap, toilet articles
Charcoal or propane barbeque with fuel
Generator with fuel and extension cords
Water pumps
Duct tape
Crank-powered emergency radio

Disaster supplies are simply a collection of basic items your family may need in the event of an emergency. It is always recommended to accumulate these supplies well in advance to avoid long lines and empty shelves at the local grocery store. Store food, water and supplies to last a minimum of three days, but quite possibly longer. Remember, you might not have power after a storm. Relief workers will often be on scene soon after a disaster but, as learned from Hurricane Sandy, itís best not to rely on outside assistance. You could get help in hours or it might take days or even weeks. Additionally, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment and telephones may also be cut off. Your emergency supply kit should contain all the essentials your family needs to help you manage during these outages.



 

Food
Stock canned foods, dry mixes and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, water or special preparation. Be sure to include a manual can opener and eating utensils, salt-free crackers, whole-grain cereals and canned foods with high liquid content. Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Try to choose foods your family will eat and remember any special dietary needs.

Water
Water is an essential element for survival. It is recommended that families purchase commercially bottled water. Keep the bottled water in its original containers and do not open them until used. Store bottled water in a cool dark place. Note: an active person needs at least one gallon of water daily just for drinking. Individual needs vary greatly, depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet and climate. For example, if you live in a warm-weather climate, more water may be necessary. In very hot temperatures, emergency water supplies may need to be doubled. During and after a hurricane, the water supply to your home can become contaminated and unfit to drink. If a ďboil waterĒ notice is issued you will need to purify any water for consumption by using one of the following methods:

BOILING: Boil vigorously for three to five minutes and then let cool. You can add a pinch of salt to improve the taste.
HYPOCHLORITE: Liquid bleach from the grocery store is all you need. Do not use bleach that has any fragrance added. Read the label to find the percentage of chlorine, it should be 5.25 percent. Add 8 drops to a gallon of water and let stand at least 30 minutes. (1 teaspoon = approximately 100 drops.) So if a dropper is not available, use a little less than 1/8 teaspoon per gallon of water. If the water has a strong chlorine smell after 30 minutes, pour it back and forth between two clean containers.
PURIFICATION TABLETS: These can be purchased from any pharmacy or camping supply store. Simply follow directions on the product box.


Home and Property Preparation
If high winds and flooding are expected, follow these common sense precautions to minimize damage to your personal property. Elevate as much furniture as possible. Raise electronics and other valuables or move them to a higher floor. Or encase valuables in heavy plastic bags. Twist and fold the top of each bag and duct tape them closed. They may not be completely waterproof but this will prevent most water from entering. Items can also be stacked on top of furniture. Anchor down trailers and boats securely to the ground or to a solid tree. Secure all outside antennas and satellite dishes. Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant and less likely to bang up against the house, causing damage. Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts. Reinforce your garage doors. If wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage. Bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down. Doors are another way hurricane-force winds can enter and destroy homes. With double doors, make sure the unused door has slide bolts that go into the top and bottom of the door frame. To relieve stress on the deadbolt, add additional slide bolts between the two doors. Sliding glass doors should be boarded up. If that is not possible, drive wedges between the top of the door and the track. This will help prevent the door from lifting off the lower track and blowing in during the storm. Brace trap doors leading to attics. Vents in roof systems can allow strong winds to swirl through your rafters, pulling the access panels open. Insulation could then get blown into your home, causing a mess that is difficult to clean up. Install sliding bolt latches to hold attic access panels in place. Bring in or securely anchor outdoor furniture, toys and tools. It is advised to secure these items inside a garage or shed. Flying projectiles during a storm account for quite a bit of damage and can be deadly. Trampolines should be turned upside down and then spiked and tied down. These giant kidsí toys are very prone to becoming airborne. Clean out the fireplace. If floodwaters reach the fireplace, ashes could be carried throughout the home. Fill the home oil tank. If these tanks are not full they can become buoyant and tip over leaving a messy and costly oil cleanup.

Cars can be totally destroyed by water as low as 12 inches in depth. If possible find high ground and a safe place to park your vehicles. If you cannot find higher ground to park your car the vehicle can be wrapped in plastic with a large tarp. Just drive onto an opened tarp and then fold up the sides of the tarp to form a giant plastic bag. Duct tape can be used to secure the top. It may not work for high water but for water levels in the 1- to 2-foot range this simple wrap can save your car. Be sure all vehicles are fueled up in case there is a power failure and gas stations are unable to pump fuel. Stock up on gasoline. If at all possible, fill up several 5-gallon containers of gasoline. Gas can be used to power generators or your car. Remember gas fumes can be deadly and increase the risk of fire greatly. Do not store gas containers in your home.

When itís time to evacuate be ready to leave while itís still safe to do so. Before evacuation, remember to unplug all appliances, and shut off the electricity, water and gas.

Window Protection
For hurricane protection, it is recommended to cover all of your homeís windows to protect the glass from wind and debris damage. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. If purchasing shutters, be sure to buy hurricane shutters and not less expensive sunshades. A second option is to board up windows with plywood. According to John Mahler of Jm2 Architecture, plywood used to board up windows should be anchored with bolts, large washers and wing nuts. The large washers prevent the plywood itself from being blown off causing additional debris hazards. Itís recommended to have the plywood on hand, precut to fit and stored on site. The plywood should be ready to install prior to a storm. Donít wait until news of the stormís arrival is eminent because supplies of plywood may not be sufficient. Some homeowners use duct tape on glass in an attempt to reduce the hazard. Tape does not prevent the windows from breaking. It just reduces the hazard of flying glass shards. A better option if shutters or plywood are not available is to protect glass with security window film that holds shattered glass together. This way shattered glass will not become deadly projectiles in storm-force winds.



 

Flood-Proofing
In flood-prone areas homeowners can try a variety of flood-proofing techniques to protect their property. FEMA defines dry flood-proofing as modifications to try to prevent water from entering the home. They define wet flood-proofing as modifications to interior finishes and removing damageable items from harmís way to reduce the effect of water that has entered a home. For the purposes of this book we are going to combine the two into one common-sense approach designed to protect your home and its contents. For example it might be a great idea for everyone in the flood zone to relocate their furnace or appliances to an upper floor, out of harmís way of most floods. At the same time if the homeowner is able to prevent water from entering the house, he may also be able to eliminate damage to his walls or flooring. Some flood-proofing techniques are quick and can be utilized without much planning. Others require substantial time and supplies. This text will detail both, providing homeowners with the option of deciding how much they will prepare. This text will list the most common wet and dry flood-proofing techniques. There are many considerations when flood-proofing, including expected depth, structural integrity and the amount of work involved. You can pick and choose which can best protect your own house. Keep in mind that multiple levels of flood-proofing offer the best protection. For example a floodwall can be combined with water-resistant materials or a water barricade with a sump pump to bail out any water that seeps through the barricade. In addition the best forms of flood-proofing, once in place, require the least amount of human intervention. This way even if a homeowner is away on vacation his home and its contents would still be protected.

Dry Flood-Proofing
Dry flood-proofing is making modifications that prevent water from entering the house. These flood-proofing techniques can range from levees and berms, which prevent water from ever reaching the structure, to making the house itself water resistant with water barricades. Each house is of course different in design and requires its own unique flood-prevention solutions.

Types of Dry Flood-Proofing
Levees Elevated walls of dirt often covered with plastic that surround the entire structure. Levees are common in many rural areas of the country. They typically require about 6 feet of horizontal space for every foot of height. They can be built with dirt and plastic sheets. If constructed far enough away from the house, homeowners can have a gradual slopping driveway that allows them to drive up and over the levee to enter or exit the property.
Floodwalls Built out of concrete, brick or stone. They are more common in suburban areas and like levees they also prevent water from reaching the structure. Floodwalls should have their own foundation and footing. Entrance gates through the wall would have to be sealed with water barricades prior to any flooding.
Berms Raised areas of dirt against the house that also prevent water from reaching the structure. A modification to a berm is to use retaining walls to elevate the ground soil around the house. Although not technically a berm, a raised garden built with concrete or brick walls could serve the same purpose. In most cases a removable dam will be needed in conjunction to seal any entrances through the berm.
Plastic barriers Made from a continuous plastic sheeting that wraps around the entire structure. This plastic sheeting is a temporary flood barrier and is typically used to seal a conventional wood home that does not have raised foundation walls. The bottom edge of the plastic is buried in a trench and secured with sandbags. The top of the plastic film can be stapled or even taped to the house. In addition a perforated pipe can be used to direct any water that leaks through the barrier to


For additional information on Flood Protection, Flood Barriers, water resistant construction materials or raising your house to prevent future flood damage refer to the book Flood Safe by Capt. Dan Berg
 

How To Make Your Home
Flood Safe
By Capt. Dan Berg

The complete homeowners guide to storm protection, flood prevention, rebuilding with water resistant materials and house lifting.

* New Book *
To order:  amazon.com

                     (click link)

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
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Nautical and Maritime Art for Waterfront Property Owners
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 Can you afford that beautiful piece of waterfront real estate? Looking to refinance or purchase a new home? Lenders Block has over 100 lenders within its exchange. Get a free home equity or new home purchase loan mortgage quote. Lenders Block   Apply Today!
   
   
   
 
 
   
The Ultimate Guide to Waterfront Living, by Daniel Berg, Your complete guide to oceanfront, riverfront, lakefront and water view homes. Everything you need to know about waterfront real estate. This book is available as an inexpensive instant-download that you can print today and read again and again

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